Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Heritage Month

APIA Affairs celebrates Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Heritage Month (APIDAHM) in the spring. This month was designated to commemorate the first Japanese immigration to the United States on May 7th, 1853. It also honors the Chinese immigrants who worked to complete the transcontinental railroad on May 10, 1869. For the past two years, we have celebrated the occasion with an event at the Hippodrome, located in downtown Gainesville, to showcase the rich and diverse Asian American cultures within the greater Gainesville community through music, performance, and food from local businesses. Please check our calendar for a specific time and date for this event.

Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Heritage Month 2018

In efforts to promote visibility of current issues in the Asian Pacific Islander Desi community, the APIDAHM theme for 2018 is the Japanese concept of Ikigai, meaning “a reason for being” or “a reason to live”. We want to highlight and share the personal narratives of students, staff, and faculty by reflecting on Ikigai. We ask you to reflect, what is your ikigai? – what is your reason for being?

2018 The Asian Pacific Islander Desi American Heritage Month Calendar of Events:

THURSDAY, APRIL 5
ARE YOU MAN ENOUGH?
3 to 4:30 p.m.
Reitz Union 2201 – MCDA Fishbowl
Featuring Dr. Chong Chon-Smith & Dr. Vincent Adejumo

“Are you MAN enough?” is a partnership between Black Affairs and APIA Affairs that will explore the concept of masculinity among the Asian American and Black communities. Joining us are Dr. Chong Chon-Smith from The City University of New York University Hunter College who wrote the book East Meets Black: Asian and Black Masculinities in the Post-Civil Rights Era and Dr. Vincent Adjumo from the African American Studies Program at UF whose research focus area includes Black masculinities.

MONDAY, APRIL 9
MOSAIC DISCUSSION GROUP
5 to 6 p.m.
Reitz Union 2203 – APIA Affairs
Suite 2203
Interracial & International Adoptee Experience

Far too often do we leave out the narratives of interracial and international adoptee voices in various communities. The lived experiences and navigation of interracial and international adoptees requires attention as we move into an era of policy changes that affect the livelihood and the success of folks who identify as such. Join us as we create space for interracial and international adoptees.

TUESDAY, APRIL 10
VENUS RISING
7 to 8:30 p.m.
Reitz Union 2201 – MCDA Fishbowl

Director, producer, educator, advocate, business woman, trans, adult film star; Venus Lux has shattered barriers and made strides for many communities. As a Chinese, Mongolian American, Venus Lux defies stereotypes and pushes boundaries. Join us in dialogue and discussion as Venus Lux shares her various experiences in analyzing the racialization of the adult film industry and how the industry shapes the perception of APIDA identified people.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 11
INTERWOVEN CULTURES
5 to 6:30 p.m.
Reitz Union 2203 – HLA Suite
The thread between the Latinx & APIDA Communities

The histories of colonization, immigration, customs and traditions, language, and cuisine of various Latinx and Asian Pacific Islander Desi communities often parallel one another. From the Spanish and Portuguese colonization to the spread of Catholicism, join us as we explore the thread between the Latinx and APIDA communities.

FRIDAY, APRIL 13
THE LATINOS OF ASIA: HOW
FILIPINOS BREAK THE RULES OF RACE
3 to 5 p.m.
Reitz Union 2201 – MCDA Fishbowl
Featuring Dr Anthony Ocampo

Dr. Anthony Ocampo is a scholar and writer who focuses on race, immigration, and LGBTQ issues. He is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Cal Poly Pomona and a Ford Foundation Fellow. He is the author of The Latinos of Asia: How Filipino Americans Break the Rules of Race, addresses this puzzle: Are Filipinos in the United States becoming Asian American or Latino? The Latinos of Asia highlights how Filipino American identities can change depending on the communities they grow up in, the schools they attend, and the people they befriend.

MONDAY, APRIL 16
6TH ANNUAL ANTHOLOGY RELEASE
5 to 7 p.m.
Reitz Union 2203 – APIA Suite

Established in 2013, APIA Affairs collects and produces an annual anthology in the Spring semester containing creative works made by APIDA-identified students, faculty, staff, alumni of the University of Florida, or community members of the local Gainesville area. The APIA Affairs Anthology provides a record of the APIA experience and showcases our community’s unheard voices and stories through an unfiltered and authentic artistic medium.

TUESDAY, APRIL 17
APIA AFFAIRS DIALOGUE SERIES PRESENTS: SAVING FACE
6 to 7:30 p.m.
Reitz Union – G320
Featuring Cathy Linh Che

‘Saving Face’ is an idiom widely used in the APIDA community as a way of maintaining dignity or preservation of reputations. The goal of this initiative is to provide an opportunity to create awareness and educate the campus community about Rape Culture. We hope that ‘Saving Face’ will be a space and place for survivors of sexual assault to take the first step in healing and educating all Gators on how to become better allies. Cathy Linh Che is the author of the poetry collection “Split”, winner of the Kundiman Poetry Prize, the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America, and the Best Poetry Book Award from the Association of Asian American Studies. “Split” recounts personal account of sexual violence against the backdrop of cultural conflict deftly illustrated through her parents’ experiences of the Vietnam War, immigration, and its aftermath.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 18
QAPID (Queer Asian Pacific Islander Desi) DISCUSSION GROUP
6 to 7 p.m.
Reitz Union – APIA Suite 2203

LGBTQ Affairs and APIA Affairs is featuring a discussion based group, QAPID – Queer Asian Pacific Islander and Desi. Through guided discussions and interactive socials, QAPID’s goal is to educate, empower, and create an inclusive community among members. This is a closed group for people who identify as APIDA and Queer or questioning. Everything that is shared in QAPID is behind closed doors – we want to make sure to offer confidentiality and a space to find community.

THURSDAY, APRIL 19
SLAAM! BOOK CLUB
3 to 4 p.m.
Reitz Union – APIA Suite 2203
Featuring Sejal Badani

slAAm! (sampling literature by Asian Americans!) Book Club features fictional works by Asian American writers and artists. slAAm! Is open for all UF affiliated current students, faculty, and staff. This year, we will be reading Sejal Badani’s “Trail of Broken Wings”. The novel deals with child abuse and how it affects everyone in the family. The book begins years later when Sonya returns home and learns that her father is in a coma and is not expected to survive. Her sisters and mother now deal with their horrific past and try to look forward to a better future. (Sign up here: https://apia.multicultural.ufl.edu/programs/slaam-book-club/)

MONDAY, APRIL 23
TOWN HALL: APIA AFFAIRS
Reitz Union – 5 to 7 p.m.

Established as a resource room in 2011, the Asian Pacific Islander American (APIA) Affairs at the University of Florida has continued to transform while relocating to the J. Wayne Reitz Union in 2016. With new leadership and an updated vision to mirror the larger mission and values of the Multicultural and Diversity Affairs, we invite the campus community to join us in this open dialogue on the current state and future of APIA Affairs.

SPONSORED BY
Center for Latin American Studies, Asian American Student Union, Black Affairs, Hispanic-Latino Affairs, Filipino Student Association, LGBTQ Affairs, and Vietnamese Student Organization

APAHM 2015